Grant to Initiate the GBRA/TAP Agreement

Goal to Address Long-Term Water Supply Needs in Guadalupe Basin and Safeguard Critical Whooping Crane Habitat

AUSTIN — The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority (GBRA) and The Aransas Project (TAP) undertook the first step in the implementation of The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority/The Aransas Project Agreement (GBRA/TAP Agreement), announcing the receipt of a grant from the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation (www.CGMF.org).

The Aransas Project

Whooping Cranes at Aransas NWR. Photo by Kevin Sims

The grant is to develop a strategy and action plan to advance implementation of the GBRA/TAP Agreement toward a shared vision for future habitat and water for Guadalupe River System and San Antonio Bay.

Developed in 2016, the GBRA/TAP agreement was reached after years of litigation over freshwater inflows for San Antonio Bay and the long-term success of the only remaining flock of wild whooping cranes in the world.

The agreement sets up a process by which GBRA and TAP will jointly investigate issues associated with the future of water usage and availability on the Guadalupe and San Antonio River systems and the freshwater needs of the whooping cranes. The work under this agreement will consider both habitat issues for the whooping cranes as well as long-term water supply and inflow issues.

Under this planning grant, GBRA and TAP are designing a process to engage key stakeholders throughout the Guadalupe River Watershed and neighboring San Antonio and Aransas Bays to inform the development of the strategy and plan to support implementation of the Agreement. This research will begin in June and will continue into the fall.

The intent of GBRA and TAP is to create a study and evaluation process that will ultimately propose distinct courses of action to ensure whooping crane habitat and long-term water availability for both humans and nature.

About The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority

The Aransas ProjectThe Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority was established by the Texas Legislature in 1933 as a water conservation and reclamation district. GBRA provides stewardship for the water resources in its 10-county statutory district, which begins near the headwaters of the Guadalupe and Blanco rivers, ends at San Antonio Bay, and includes Kendall, Comal, Hays, Caldwell, Guadalupe, Gonzales, DeWitt, Victoria, Calhoun, and Refugio counties. GBRA provides services that include hydroelectric generation; water and wastewater treatment; municipal, industrial, and agricultural raw water supply; and recreational operations.

About The Aransas Project

The Aransas ProjectThe Aransas Project was founded by a diverse group of organizations who believe that the whooping cranes, the Texas coast and the freshwater of the Guadalupe River Basin are essential to our way of life. TAP is committed to ensuring Guadalupe River flows from the Hill Country to the coast and for the protection of San Antonio and Aransas Bays and the endangered whooping crane. TAP’s membership includes governmental entities such as Aransas County, City of Rockport and Town of Fulton and non-governmental organizations such as the International Crane Foundation, American Bird Conservancy, Audubon Texas, Matagorda Bay Foundation, Houston, Coastal Bend and Travis Audubon Societies, Aransas Bird and Nature Club, Aransas County Guides Association and several Rockport-area businesses.

For more information, contact:
Todd Votteler, tvotteler@gbra.org or (830) 379-5822 and
Jim Blackburn, jbb@blackburncarter.com or (713) 501-9840

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River authority and advocacy group sign new agreement

By Sara Sneath – Victory Advocate

The Aransas Project

Whooping Cranes at Aransas NWR. Photo by Kevin Sims

The Aransas Project and Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority have recommitted to working together to find ways to balance the water needs of an ever-growing population and threatened wildlife.

The two groups, which have historically fought in court over differing visions of water needs, first signed an agreement to work together in February.

But the river authority’s longtime general manager, Bill West, retired in late September. The new agreement was signed Monday by West’s successor, Kevin Patteson.

“The signing of the agreement is just another way to reaffirm our commitment to conducting the appropriate studies related to the Guadalupe River watershed,” Patteson said. “And to meeting our mutually agreed-upon goals.”

The agreement is not legally binding, but Jim Blackburn, The Aransas Project’s former attorney and current board member, said the good faith agreement is innovative in its approach to water management in the state.

The six-page document outlines the need for more research into habitat needs for endangered whooping cranes, freshwater mussels and other wildlife in the Guadalupe Delta. The document also addresses the need for a dollar value to be placed on water in the state.

This value would include the true cost of taking water that would otherwise flow into the bay, supporting estuaries, as well as commercial and recreational fishing.

The groups plan to meet early next year to seek funding and further devise their strategy, Blackburn said.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

 friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

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