Wood Buffalo Whooping Cranes Have Record 98 Nests

Great news for everyone interested in the Aransas Wood Buffalo population of wild Whooping Cranes. Whooping Crane recovery and management is going strong with these endangered birds. Mike Keizer, External Manager, Wood Buffalo National Park stated ,”Some news that I hope will put a bounce in your step.”

Mr Keizer advised that, “A record number of whooping cranes have been found in Wood Buffalo National Park during the 2017 nesting survey carried out by Parks Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada. This year’s survey found 98 nests, an increase of 16 over the previous record of 82 set in 2014.”

98 nests at Whooping crane nesting grounds./Wood Buffalo National Park.

Two adults and one juvenile whooping crane. Photo: John McKinnon / ©2014 Parks Canada /Wood Buffalo National Park.

Protecting and promoting ecological integrity is a priority for Parks Canada. Keizer stated that, “The data gathered each year allows us to track the health and growth of the population, and allows us to assess the current state of the crane’s habitat, which Parks is directly responsible for. The Whooping Crane nesting area is one of the reasons why Wood Buffalo was named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.”

Keizer elaborated, “2017 also offers an opportunity to celebrate this amazing recovery successes story of the Whooping Crane and take strides to advance protected areas and biodiversity as part of the celebration of Canada’s 150th.

Friends of the Wild Whoopers will provide more details about this amazing conservation milestone soon. We will explain how Wood Buffalo National Park field staff and Environment and Climate Change Canada gather this important information and what it could mean for the future of world’s only wild migratory Whooping Crane flock.

Whooping it up in Wood Buffalo.

Share

6 thoughts on “Wood Buffalo Whooping Cranes Have Record 98 Nests

    • And thank you Cheryl for your comment. Friends of the Wild Whoopers works long and hard to do all we can to assist in the proper management and protection of the only self sustaining population of Whooping Cranes on planet Earth. We are continuing to focus on protecting and managing habitat, especially “stopover habitat”. along the 2,500 mile migration corridor. The Whoopers must stop to rest and feed approximately 20 times between Wood Buffalo, Canada and Aransas Refuge, Texas. So the “stopover habitat” is a necessity as much as the nesting grounds and wintering grounds. Importantly the stopover habitats provide habitat for numerous other species.

      • HOPEFULLY you won’t be able to use the phrase “only self sustaining population of Whooping Cranes” too much longer. 🙂

  1. This is fantastic news. Just two nests shy of 100! Next year. Thank you, FOTWW for the awesome news. I can’t wait to see the results of the survey in August.

    Does anyone know when the results of the December survey will be released? It would be nice to know how many whooping cranes were estimated at ANWR.

    Keep up the good work with educating the public and saving habitat. You guys are exceptional and I am happy there is a group that dwells on the only wild flock. Thank you for all you do! 😉

    • Jessie, the record 98 Whooping Crane nest on Wood Buffalo is indeed fantastic news. Friends of the Wild Whoopers appreciates your reply.

      Unfortunately we, nor anyone knows when the results of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service December Whooper population survey on Aransas NWR will be available. The Regional office in New Mexico is responsible for making the estimate. FOTWW understands that the Regional personnel have higher priority responsibilities.

      And thank you Jessie for your comments . Friends of the Wild Whoopers works long and hard to do all we can to assist in the proper management and protection of the only self sustaining population of Whooping Cranes on planet Earth. We are continuing to focus on protecting and managing habitat, especially “stopover habitat”. along the 2,500 mile migration corridor. The Whoopers must stop to rest and feed approximately 20 times between Wood Buffalo, Canada and Aransas Refuge, Texas. So the “stopover habitat” is a necessity as much as the nesting grounds and wintering grounds. Importantly the stopover habitats provide habitat for numerous other species.

  2. I live in Victoria about an hour away from Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. I am a brand new Texas Master Naturalist, and I’m so happy to hear this news!

Comments are closed.