Wood Buffalo National Park-Birthplace of Whooping Cranes

Wood Buffalo National Park – Birthplace of Whooping Cranes

 

Wood Buffalo National Park - Birthplace of Whooping Cranes.Whooping Crane Chick.
Photo by Tom Lynn © Tom Lynn

In the Canadian north, where Alberta meets The Northwest Territories, lies Wood Buffalo National Park, where endangered Whooping Cranes dance, nest, and raise their young. “I like to describe Wood Buffalo National Park as a place of superlatives,” says park superintendent Rob Kent. “Visitors can see pristine ecosystems, 5,000 bison, 150-pound wolves, and the largest freshwater delta in North America.” When summer ends and the juvenile cranes are able to fly, they migrate 2,700 miles to their wintering grounds on the Gulf Coast of Texas.

 

Click on the PODCAST and follow the Transcript to get a better perspective.  Brought to you courtesy of BirdNote!

 

 

Transcript:
BirdNote®

Wood Buffalo National Park – Birthplace of Whooping Cranes

Written by Chris Peterson with special thanks to Rob Kent, WBNP Superintendent

This is BirdNote!

[Calls of Whooping Cranes]

In the Canadian north, where Alberta meets The Northwest Territories, lies the huge Wood Buffalo National Park. Here the Peace and Athabasca Rivers run through fescue grasslands, boreal forests, and wetlands of international significance. Here one of the world’s most endangered birds, the Whooping Crane, comes to dance, nest, and raise its young.

[Calls of Whooping Cranes]

“I like to describe Wood Buffalo National Park as a place of superlatives,” says park superintendent Rob Kent. “Visitors can see pristine ecosystems, 5,000 bison, 150-pound wolves, the largest freshwater delta in North America, and fire and ice that shape things on a grand scale. [Jump in a Cessna 210, and it’ll take you almost two hours to fly across.]”

[wolf howl followed by wetland]

The world’s last completely wild flock of Whooping Cranes – about 275 – returns in spring to a vast mosaic of marshes and shallow ponds. In summer, with 20 hours of daylight, you can almost hear the explosive growth of plants and insects. [Insects] The insects become food for the dragonfly larvae that become food for the birds. [With their necks outstretched, the birds can stand five feet tall.]

When summer ends and the juveniles are able to fly, the cranes fly 2,700 miles to winter on the Gulf Coast of Texas.

[Calls of Whooping Cranes]

[The immense dark skies of the park now dance with northern lights.]

See videos and learn more at birdnote.org.

###

Bird sounds provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Calls of Whooping Cranes [2748 and 2749] recorded by George Archibald; honey bee and other insects [60446] recorded by V.J. Ketner.

Nature SFX sounds recorded by Gordon Hempton of Quietplanet.com. #18 stream flowing, #63 coniferous forest with insects, ravens and other birds; wetland pond with morning birdsong #97

BirdNote’s theme music was composed and played by Nancy Rumbel and John Kessler.

Producer: John Kessler

Executive Producer: Chris Peterson

© 2014 Tune In to Nature.org    April 2014   Narrator: Michael Stein

ID#     WHCR-woodbuffalo-01-2014-04-17 WHCR-woodbuffalo-01

Wood Buffalo National Park of Canada

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population
of wild whooping cranes and their habitat
. *****

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friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

 

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Wood Buffalo National Park

Friends of the Wild Whoopers has posted many articles that told about whooping cranes migrating and raising their families on Wood Buffalo National Park. In fact 300 wild whoopers have now migrated from Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas and the breeding pairs are currently nesting at Wood Buffalo National Park. This is the only location on earth where a self-sustaining flock of wild whooping cranes nests.

But Wood Buffalo is much more than whooping cranes and we want you to know more about this amazing Canadian national park. This short video showcases Canada’s largest UNESCO world heritage site and national park as well as its oldest northern national park. This has been created from a collection of spectacular images for your viewing enjoyment by the folks who know the place – Parks Canada.

View it on “full screen” to be amazed:  Wood Buffalo National Park 2011 by Parks Canada.

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population
of wild whooping cranes and their habitat
. *****

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friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

 

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Whooping Crane Conservation topic for Audubon Meeting

Whooper adult and juvenile amazed

Friends of the Wild Whoopers member, Chester McConnell will present a program on “Whooping Cranes Conservation Efforts” at the Mobile Bay Audubon Society meeting according to Gaye Lindsey (Audubon birding coordinator). McConnell explained that his presentation will focus on management efforts for the wild whooping crane flock that migrates between Aransas Refuge in Texas and Wood Buffalo Park nesting grounds in Canada.

In addition he will discuss the two experimental flocks in the eastern U.S.   Operation Migration’s ultra-lite plane led whooping cranes fly through the entire length of Alabama on their migration path from Wisconsin to Florida. Many citizens turn out along the migration corridor to observe this most interesting effort.

Threats to the whooping crane programs including oil spills and wind energy projects will also be described.

McConnell said, “The last wild whooping cranes to be recorded in Alabama was on Dauphin Island and Prattville during November 1899 but many people continue to be interested in these beautiful  endangered birds.” Whooping cranes are the largest birds in North America and stand 5 feet tall and have wing spans of 7 feet.

Audubon’s meeting will be at Alabama’s 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center , Spanish Fort, Alabama on Tuesday, May 13 starting at 7:00 p.m. Ms. Lindsey explained that this will be an excellent presentation which is open to the public.

To learn more about Friends of The Wild Whoopers organization click on: FOTWW

***** FOTWW’s mission is to protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population
of wild whooping cranes and their habitat
. *****

friendsofthewildwhoopers.org logo
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

 

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Wild Whooping Crane News from the Nesting Grounds…

Whooping crane nesting grounds
Wood Buffalo National Park – Photo courtesy of John David McKinnon

Wild Whooping Crane News from the Nesting Grounds…

The following is news courtesy of Wood Buffalo National Park Technician, John David McKinnon,.

“Welcome Home Whoopers!!!

Spring is here and the whooping cranes have begun to return to their nests in and around Wood Buffalo National Park.

Wood Buffalo National Park and the Canadian Wildlife Service are pleased to report the first arrivals of whooping cranes to their nesting grounds in the vast wetlands in northern WBNP. An ongoing telemetry project, a cooperative effort between CWS, Parks Canada and six US-based agencies, has allowed us to see that the cranes first arrived back on April 23rd.”

Long live the Wild Whoopers!”

Friends of the Wild Whoopers (FOTWW) talked about the migration with McKinnon. He explained that “We are always excited when the whooping cranes return to Canada from the U.S. We understand that they had a good winter at Aransas National Refuge and hope the birds will have a productive nesting season at WBNP.”

As of today only a few of the estimated 304 wild whooping cranes have completed their 2,500 mile migration to WBNP from the Texas coast. Others are expected to arrive throughout the month of May. Soon the mated pairs will return to their traditional nesting sites to construct their nest, lay two eggs and hopefully raise twin whooper chicks. Whooping cranes form pair bonds at ages 4 to 5 years and mate for life.

Friends of the Wild Whoopers wishes to thank John for this update on the first arrivals.

 ***** FOTWW’s mission is to protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population
of wild whooping cranes and their habitat
. *****

friendsofthewildwhoopers.org logo
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org
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