Kathleen Kaska, author, presents slideshow

Kathleen Kaska, author, presents slideshow

Author of
Kathleen Kaska, author

Sequin Gazette

Today at 3:22PM

Author Kathleen Kaska gives a slide presentation at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 16, at the Dungeness River Audubon Center in Sequim, WA about the work of Audubon ornithologist Robert Porter Allen, outlining his work on behalf of the whooping crane.

The presentation is dubbed, “The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane: The Robert Porter Allen Story.”

Allen led an adventurous life dedicated to the preservation of endangered birds when the odds were overwhelmingly against success. He journeyed into the Canadian wilderness to save the last flock of whooping cranes before encroaching development wiped out their nesting site, sending them into extinction.

Kaska is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, travel articles and stage plays, and recently completed “The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane: The Robert Porter Allen Story.”

The Robert Porter Allen Story
The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane by Kathleen Kaska

Published by the University Press of Florida, the book was released in September 2012 and was nominated for the George Perkins March award for environmental history. She will be available to autograph her book.

After graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in physical anthropology, Kaska taught middle-school science for 25 years. She was a staff writer for Austin Fit magazine from 1998-2002. Her articles have appeared in Cape Cod Life, Marco Polo, Agatha Christie Chronicle and Home Cooking magazines. She is a frequent contributor to Texas Highways magazine.

The program is free and open to the public.

The Dungeness River Audubon Center is at 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim, WA.

 

 

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Experts Fear Impacts of Oil Cleanup on Texas Gulf Coast

Experts Fear Impacts of Oil Cleanup on Texas Gulf Coast|
April 11, 2014 | 9:45 AM
By

Oil cleanup itself could disturb the ecosystem along the Texas Gulf Coast. Nowhere is threat more apparent than at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.
Workers scraping oil-drenched sand from the beaches of Matagorda Island.

MATAGORDA ISLAND, TX — Recovery efforts continue weeks after a barge accident in the Houston Ship Channel dumped tens of thousands of barrels of oil into Galveston Bay. That oil kills wildlife and damages the environment. But some are worried the cleanup itself could also disturb the ecosystem along the Texas Gulf Coast. Nowhere is that threat more apparent than in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.

Every morning this week, hundreds of workers have gone out to Matagorda Island, a part of that refuge, to try to remove the oil. On a recent tour organized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the response team appeared to work with great care, gingerly scraping thin layers of oil-drenched sand away with shovels, then depositing it into nearby excavators for delivery into larger dump trucks. Over ten tons of sand has been removed so far.

Randal Ogrydziak, the U.S. Coast Guard captain who is one of the coordinators of the spill response, likens the painstaking process to shoveling a gravel driveway after a snow storm.

“You can think of it as the snow is the oil — not that thick — the driveway is the good sand underneath, and you just want to take bad stuff and get rid of that, and leave the good sand,” Ogrydziak says. “We don’t want to dig up the whole beach here. That’s not what we want to do.”

Oil cleanup itself could disturb the ecosystem along the Texas Gulf Coast. Nowhere is threat more apparent than at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.
Photo: Mose Buchele ~ Randal Ogrydziak, the US Coast Guard Captain who is one of the coordinators of the spill.

Ogrydziak’s concern that the cleanup could do “more damage than the oil” is not limited to the sand. This thin barrier island, like the rest of the National Wildlife Refuge, is not meant for people. Now it’s home to ATVs, bobcat excavators, dump trucks, helicopters, and hundreds of response personnel. They – and the oil – all arrived right as migratory animals are passing through on their annual trip.

“The oil spill could not have happened at a worse time,” says Nancy Brown, a spokesperson for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “You have these birds that have migrated literally across the Gulf of Mexico. They arrive here, they are exhausted, [and] all they want to do is get something to eat, get something to drink, rest, and then continue their migration.”

But Brown says if they’re constantly being disturbed by the cleanup activity, “they’re not only not eating, they’re wasting calories trying to get away.”

They can also be spooked from their nests by the activity, leaving eggs and young animals vulnerable to predators. Workers here say they’re doing their best by limiting trips to and from the island, being careful with vehicles, and enforcing a “flight ceiling” on helicopters so they don’t disturb the birds.

Oil cleanup itself could disturb the ecosystem along the Texas Gulf Coast. Nowhere is threat more apparent than at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.
Photo: Mose Buchele ~ After the oil was pushed ashore, it was covered by a layer of sand, making it more difficult to detect.

Of particular concern is the endangered whooping crane. This refuge is home to the only naturally-occurring flock of those birds in the world. Around 300 whooping cranes winter here, and many have not yet left for their summer grounds in Canada.

Right as the cranes leave, the Kemps-Ridley sea turtle arrives. That’s also an endangered species. It lays its eggs on the same beaches – now oily beaches – where the response crews are working with excavators and dump trucks to remove the oil.

Jeremy Edwardson, a Fish and Wildlife Biologist, says it will be difficult to measure the full impact of the spill and the recovery efforts.

“I don’t think we’ll ever understand it,” says Edwardson. “There’s some stuff to document and it’s easy to document. But there’s also the potential for oil to be here for years, so it’s possibly going to be an ongoing response.”

Source: StateImpact Texas  ~ A reporting project of  NPR member stations

 

 

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Whooping Cranes spotted at Cheyenne Bottoms

Whooping Cranes
Great Bend Tribune
By Karen LaPierre County Reporter
klapierre@gbtribune.com

Whooping Cranes spotted at Cheyenne Bottoms
Whooping Cranes – Dr. Dan Witt
Whooping Cranes – Dr. Dan Witt

Two whooping cranes have been spotted at Cheyenne Bottoms. Fifteen were spotted at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge. Curtis Wolf, site manager for the Kansas Wetlands Education Center said that he got a call from a woman from Kansas City willing to drive hundreds of miles to check seeing an endangered whooping crane off her bucket list.

Source: gbtribune

 

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Concerns Mounting About Effects Of Oil Spill On Whooping Cranes

Concerns Mounting About Effects Of Oil Spill On Whooping Cranes

by Friends of the Wild Whoopers

Friends of the Wild Whoopers (FOTWW) concerns are intensifying about the oil spill that occurred March 22 in Galveston Bay, Texas. Tar balls from this spill have now come ashore on Matagorda Island which is a part of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. And the refuge is the winter home of the only remaining wild flock of whooping cranes on the planet. The whoopers are endangered species and should receive the utmost consideration.

After viewing videos of the oil removal videos recorded on South Matagorda Island, Texas on March 31, 2014 FOTWW became alarmed (View on dvidshub.net ). The large number of personnel and equipment involved in the cleanup is impressive but serious caution is appropriate as the operation moves onto Aransas Refuge. The size of the operation and techniques needs to be carefully reconsidered when cleanup begins on the refuge portion of Matagorda Island. Whooping cranes and other endangered species must now be the top priority.

 National Seashore Park Oil Cleanup whooping crane
Crew members work to remove oil and reduce impact to the beaches of National Seashore Park April 1, 2014. Machinery was provided by Miller Environmental Service to help sift together any materials containing oil that may have washed up ashore. Crew members worked in large groups to help clean the beach efficiently. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class

 FOTWW contacted Nancy Brown, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to get an update on the oil spill. An official from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department were officially appointed  to the Unified Command on April 2, 2014. Ms. Brown advised that, “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is on the ground trying to determine how best to remove and transport oil off Matagorda Island.

Approximately 4 miles of Matagorda Island beach received significant amounts of oil. Basically the beach area is four miles long and 30 yards wide.  That portion has about 75% of oil on it but the coverage is inconsistent. The impact goes up to the high tide mark and not into the dune system.

Brown continued that the Unified Command was continuing to consider methods to remove the oil off the island with minimal impacts to wildlife and their habitats. She emphasized the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would have monitors in place and travel with clean-up vehicles to document any impacts to whooping cranes and other species of wildlife.

FOTWW requested Ms. Brown to ask the Unified Command to consider leaving the oil in place on the beach for two weeks to allow time for the whooping cranes to move north on their normal migration. Currently most of the tar balls have been covered by sands washed by on the beach by Gulf of Mexico waves. Based on reports from flyway observers, less than 25% of the whooping cranes have departed from Aransas Refuge. FOTWW believes that the disturbance to the whoopers caused by the oil clean-up operation may be more of a problem than delaying clean-up activities for 2 weeks.

According to the “Texas City “Y” Response” news release, “Wildlife officials report an increase in the number of oiled and recovered birds from the Matagorda / Padre Island area. As of late Monday night 43 deceased animals were in possession of wildlife experts including a mix of loons, herons, terns, shorebirds and others. There are no reports of harmful impacts on Whooping Cranes in the area. Two deceased fresh water turtles were brought to the center over the weekend. Medical analysis will make an ultimate determination regarding the causes of death. Persons who observe any impacted wildlife should not attempt to capture or handle them but are urged to call 888-384-2000.” The Unified Command has made minimizing impacts to wildlife and the refuge landscape a top priority. They are using hand crews and UTVs in an effort to minimize disturbance to shorebirds and other wildlife

The March 22nd Galveston Bay toxic spill continues to threaten bird life and sensitive habitats along a growing stretch of the Texas Gulf Coast. Tar balls nearly the size of softballs have washed ashore on Mustang Island, roughly 200 miles south of the site of the spill. Critical dangers remain for birds and sensitive Gulf habitats.

whooping crane

Last week, Capt. Randal Ogrydziak, deputy sector commander for the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Corpus Christi advised that on Wednesday, a 15-mile patch of oil was seen offshore near the Matagorda pass. Heavy sea began breaking up the patch during the night. Six- to 8-foot waves churned the oil, breaking it up into globs ranging from the size of a basketball court to a fist.

“So that’s all rolling in the surf zone and coming up on the beach and stranding, which is good. Let’s keep it in one place,” Ogrydziak said. While the heavy oil is predicted to stay put – where responders will begin a cleanup – the oil sheen may move farther south, he said. Endangered whooping cranes on Matagorda Island are on the bay side, opposite from where the oil is washing up, Ogrydziak said. “They’re not being impacted by the oil at all,” he said.

Kemp’s ridley sea turtles, also an endangered species, are expected to reach the island next month. “By May, I’m very hopeful we’ll be able to get the oil off the beach, and the turtles can come in and do what the turtles have to do,” Ogrydziak said.

A Texas City “Y” Response news release reported on April 2, 2014 that “Oil spill response plans for today center around continuing efforts to collect oiled sand and debris from impacted shoreline along South Matagorda and Mustang islands and parts of the Padre Island National Seashore. While high tides may limit areas accessible for safe activity by work crews, “Aggressive work will continue wherever and whenever possible,” according to Matagorda Command Post Incident Commander Randal S. Ogryzdiak.

“Plans for today call for approximately 389 response contractors to continue their good work along the shores in conjunction with federal and state wildlife agency personnel who are on alert for sightings of distressed birds and marine life, “said Incident Commander Randal S. Ogryzdiak. “ I’m pleased with the progress we’ve made to date and am confident we’re moving steadily in the right direction.”

Yesterday, response crews removed approximately 32,900 pounds of oiled sand and debris from shoreline on south Matagorda and Mustang islands and at the Padre Island National Seashore. Since shoreline recovery efforts began, approximately 71,350 pounds of oiled sand and debris has been removed.

Oil on North Padre Island seems confined largely to tar balls in certain areas. Vehicular traffic in the Padre Island National Seashore remains closed to traffic at this time although pedestrians still have access to the area.

Incident Command Rapid Assessment Teams continue their reconnaissance of shoreline and ocean from the Colorado River to the Rio Grande River in Brownsville, TX, which covers approximately 225 miles of south Texas shoreline and comprises two-thirds of the Texas coastline.

Members of the Unified Command are scheduled to participate in an informational session to take place on Thursday, April 3, at the Port O’Connor Elementary School, 508 Monroe Avenue. The session will begin at 6:30 p.m. and allow attendees’ access to officials from a variety of federal, state and local agencies, including the United States Coast Guard, Texas General Land Office, Texas Parks and Wildlife, NOAA, Texas Department of Health Services, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife.

FOTWW seriously urges the Unified Command to consider leaving the oil in place on the Matagorda Island beach for two weeks to allow time for the whooping cranes to move north on their normal migration. Currently most of the tar balls have been covered by sands washed by on the beach by Gulf of Mexico waves. Based on reports from flyway observers, less than 25% of the whooping cranes have departed from Aransas Refuge. FOTWW believes that the disturbance to the whoopers caused by the oil clean-up operation may be more of a problem than delaying clean-up activities for 2 weeks.

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