Concerns Mounting About Effects Of Oil Spill On Whooping Cranes

Concerns Mounting About Effects Of Oil Spill On Whooping Cranes

by Friends of the Wild Whoopers

Friends of the Wild Whoopers (FOTWW) concerns are intensifying about the oil spill that occurred March 22 in Galveston Bay, Texas. Tar balls from this spill have now come ashore on Matagorda Island which is a part of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. And the refuge is the winter home of the only remaining wild flock of whooping cranes on the planet. The whoopers are endangered species and should receive the utmost consideration.

After viewing videos of the oil removal videos recorded on South Matagorda Island, Texas on March 31, 2014 FOTWW became alarmed (View on dvidshub.net ). The large number of personnel and equipment involved in the cleanup is impressive but serious caution is appropriate as the operation moves onto Aransas Refuge. The size of the operation and techniques needs to be carefully reconsidered when cleanup begins on the refuge portion of Matagorda Island. Whooping cranes and other endangered species must now be the top priority.

 National Seashore Park Oil Cleanup whooping crane
Crew members work to remove oil and reduce impact to the beaches of National Seashore Park April 1, 2014. Machinery was provided by Miller Environmental Service to help sift together any materials containing oil that may have washed up ashore. Crew members worked in large groups to help clean the beach efficiently. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class

 FOTWW contacted Nancy Brown, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to get an update on the oil spill. An official from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department were officially appointed  to the Unified Command on April 2, 2014. Ms. Brown advised that, “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is on the ground trying to determine how best to remove and transport oil off Matagorda Island.

Approximately 4 miles of Matagorda Island beach received significant amounts of oil. Basically the beach area is four miles long and 30 yards wide.  That portion has about 75% of oil on it but the coverage is inconsistent. The impact goes up to the high tide mark and not into the dune system.

Brown continued that the Unified Command was continuing to consider methods to remove the oil off the island with minimal impacts to wildlife and their habitats. She emphasized the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would have monitors in place and travel with clean-up vehicles to document any impacts to whooping cranes and other species of wildlife.

FOTWW requested Ms. Brown to ask the Unified Command to consider leaving the oil in place on the beach for two weeks to allow time for the whooping cranes to move north on their normal migration. Currently most of the tar balls have been covered by sands washed by on the beach by Gulf of Mexico waves. Based on reports from flyway observers, less than 25% of the whooping cranes have departed from Aransas Refuge. FOTWW believes that the disturbance to the whoopers caused by the oil clean-up operation may be more of a problem than delaying clean-up activities for 2 weeks.

According to the “Texas City “Y” Response” news release, “Wildlife officials report an increase in the number of oiled and recovered birds from the Matagorda / Padre Island area. As of late Monday night 43 deceased animals were in possession of wildlife experts including a mix of loons, herons, terns, shorebirds and others. There are no reports of harmful impacts on Whooping Cranes in the area. Two deceased fresh water turtles were brought to the center over the weekend. Medical analysis will make an ultimate determination regarding the causes of death. Persons who observe any impacted wildlife should not attempt to capture or handle them but are urged to call 888-384-2000.” The Unified Command has made minimizing impacts to wildlife and the refuge landscape a top priority. They are using hand crews and UTVs in an effort to minimize disturbance to shorebirds and other wildlife

The March 22nd Galveston Bay toxic spill continues to threaten bird life and sensitive habitats along a growing stretch of the Texas Gulf Coast. Tar balls nearly the size of softballs have washed ashore on Mustang Island, roughly 200 miles south of the site of the spill. Critical dangers remain for birds and sensitive Gulf habitats.

whooping crane

Last week, Capt. Randal Ogrydziak, deputy sector commander for the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Corpus Christi advised that on Wednesday, a 15-mile patch of oil was seen offshore near the Matagorda pass. Heavy sea began breaking up the patch during the night. Six- to 8-foot waves churned the oil, breaking it up into globs ranging from the size of a basketball court to a fist.

“So that’s all rolling in the surf zone and coming up on the beach and stranding, which is good. Let’s keep it in one place,” Ogrydziak said. While the heavy oil is predicted to stay put – where responders will begin a cleanup – the oil sheen may move farther south, he said. Endangered whooping cranes on Matagorda Island are on the bay side, opposite from where the oil is washing up, Ogrydziak said. “They’re not being impacted by the oil at all,” he said.

Kemp’s ridley sea turtles, also an endangered species, are expected to reach the island next month. “By May, I’m very hopeful we’ll be able to get the oil off the beach, and the turtles can come in and do what the turtles have to do,” Ogrydziak said.

A Texas City “Y” Response news release reported on April 2, 2014 that “Oil spill response plans for today center around continuing efforts to collect oiled sand and debris from impacted shoreline along South Matagorda and Mustang islands and parts of the Padre Island National Seashore. While high tides may limit areas accessible for safe activity by work crews, “Aggressive work will continue wherever and whenever possible,” according to Matagorda Command Post Incident Commander Randal S. Ogryzdiak.

“Plans for today call for approximately 389 response contractors to continue their good work along the shores in conjunction with federal and state wildlife agency personnel who are on alert for sightings of distressed birds and marine life, “said Incident Commander Randal S. Ogryzdiak. “ I’m pleased with the progress we’ve made to date and am confident we’re moving steadily in the right direction.”

Yesterday, response crews removed approximately 32,900 pounds of oiled sand and debris from shoreline on south Matagorda and Mustang islands and at the Padre Island National Seashore. Since shoreline recovery efforts began, approximately 71,350 pounds of oiled sand and debris has been removed.

Oil on North Padre Island seems confined largely to tar balls in certain areas. Vehicular traffic in the Padre Island National Seashore remains closed to traffic at this time although pedestrians still have access to the area.

Incident Command Rapid Assessment Teams continue their reconnaissance of shoreline and ocean from the Colorado River to the Rio Grande River in Brownsville, TX, which covers approximately 225 miles of south Texas shoreline and comprises two-thirds of the Texas coastline.

Members of the Unified Command are scheduled to participate in an informational session to take place on Thursday, April 3, at the Port O’Connor Elementary School, 508 Monroe Avenue. The session will begin at 6:30 p.m. and allow attendees’ access to officials from a variety of federal, state and local agencies, including the United States Coast Guard, Texas General Land Office, Texas Parks and Wildlife, NOAA, Texas Department of Health Services, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife.

FOTWW seriously urges the Unified Command to consider leaving the oil in place on the Matagorda Island beach for two weeks to allow time for the whooping cranes to move north on their normal migration. Currently most of the tar balls have been covered by sands washed by on the beach by Gulf of Mexico waves. Based on reports from flyway observers, less than 25% of the whooping cranes have departed from Aransas Refuge. FOTWW believes that the disturbance to the whoopers caused by the oil clean-up operation may be more of a problem than delaying clean-up activities for 2 weeks.

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Texas Whooping Crane Wintering Area

3/25/14. The International Crane Foundation’s Texas Program is concerned about the Kirby Inland Marine oil spill that occurred in Galveston Bay, Texas on March 22 (learn more about the spill). If prevailing winds and currents drive the oil spill southwest along the Texas coast, there may be a possible landfall of spilled oil along Matagorda Island and adjacent bays later this week. This could potentially put the endangered Whooping Crane at risk. An estimated 304 Whooping Cranes maintain their winter territories on the central Texas coast (including Matagorda Island); this is the only naturally occurring Whooping Crane population in the world.

Although the cranes are beginning their spring migration back to Canada, many Whooping Cranes are currently at risk in the Matagorda/Aransas National Wildlife Refuge area from the immediate impact of spilled oil. And any long-term impacts will continue to affect this recovering endangered species.

 

To read complete article, click here. –>>  Texas Whooping Crane Wintering Area May be Affected by Oil Spill

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For anyone interested in possible impacts to the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge from the Galveston oil spill. FOTWW has received the following information from the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.

“At this time the refuge has not had any impacts though we are monitoring the situation and trying to prepare for various possibilities. The oil spill incident is under the leadership of a Unified Command comprised of various local, state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They have created a website to keep the public informed — www.texascityyresponse.com.

If you would like to receive that information via email, you can sign up https://www.piersystem.com/go/mailinglist/4703/

This is the best and most reliable source of information on the Galveston oil spill.”

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Whooping Crane Festival at Port Aransas, TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WCF 2014 News header
Welcome to the Whooping Crane Festival
Come Whoop It Up at our 18th Annual Whooping Crane Festival! Join us February 20-23, 2014 for a weekend full of all things ‘birdy’!
Early registration closes February 10. Register today by clicking here!

BREAKING NEWS
Guest Speaker Added to Festival Line-up Attendees at the Whooping Crane Festival in Port Aransas will learn even more about the endangered species this year! For the first time in the festival’s eighteen year history, the superintendent of Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada will be one of the featured speakers.  Rob Kent, who oversees the nesting grounds of the cranes, will give a special presentation on Friday evening, February 21, at UTMSI. With aerial discovery in 1954 of the cranes nesting within Wood Buffalo National Park, advocates of the Whooping Crane were elated. The mystery had been solved as to where the cranes were nesting and that they were already in a protected area. Don’t miss this presentation on the protection and recovery from the nesting grounds in WBNP.
Raffle Tickets Now Available!  

Be sure to purchase tickets for our awesome raffle this year ~ benefitting the conservation of Whooping Cranes!

  • Vortex Viper HD 20-60X80 Spotting Scope & Pro GT Series Tripod
  • Ranger 8×42 Binoculars
  • Migration Tour w/lunch for 2 at Fennessey Ranch
  • 8-9 Hour Deep Sea Fishing Trip for 2 – Fisherman’s Wharf
  • Dolphin Watch Trip for 2 – Island Queen
  • “Wildlife in Focus VI” Books – Fennessey Ranch
  • $100 H-E-B Gift Certificate
Stop by our Visitors Center now to purchase your raffle tickets. The Chamber will also be selling raffle tickets and our 2014 festival T-Shirt at the Bird’s Nest Trade Show.
Stay up to date on the festival excitement by checking us out on Facebook, Twitter and our website!
Stay & play in ‘Port A!’
‘Port A’ Nature Video
Port Aransas, Texas ~ Naturally Fun!
Port Aransas, Texas ~ Naturally Fun!
Festival Updates
January 2014

Festival Speakers

Local expert birder, Mel Cooksey, will be a guest speaker discussing shorebirds at this year’s festival. Additional presenters will discuss the Eastern Partnership, the Reintroduction of Whooping Cranes to Louisiana, and Are Birds and Humans Different?, among other interesting subjects.

Birding at La Copita
The Festival offers a wonderful post-festival trip to birdwatch at

La Copita Ranch. This morning excursion wraps up the fantastic birding opportunities that we offer during the festival. Check it out!

Photography Workshops

Larry Ditto’s photography workshops and trips are filling fast. Reserve your space today!

In The News
Endangered Whooping Cranes taught to migrate south behind an ultralight plane! Click here to watch the story.

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 www.whoopingcranefestival.org   800-45-COAST  | (361) 749-5919
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