Welcome Friends

Friends of the Wild Whoopers,  (a.k.a FOTWW) is a 501c3 nonprofit conservation organization whose mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat.

We would like to educate those who have an interest in protecting this beautiful American bird, as well as bringing you the latest news on the Whooper.

Make sure you subscribe to stay informed. If you would like to contribute in any way, we would love to hear from you. Donations are always welcome to help with our expenses.

 

Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) fundraiser

Friends of the Wild Whoopers
Whooping cranes enjoying the wild.

One of our newer and very enthusiastic supporters, Ali Forest-Walker has decided to host a Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) fundraiser on her Facebook page in hopes of raising money for FOTWW and the wild whooping cranes.  She took FOTWW’s president, Chester McConnell’s words to heart when he said “If you, or anyone would volunteer as a fundraiser, we would love to have you on board.” How wonderful of her to do this for us. She asked us permission to conduct a fundraiser and we immediately said “yes”, gave her our blessing, and wished her lots of success. Perhaps a few others will follow her lead too.

If you want to donate to Ali’s fundraiser and helping us continue our work, here is the link. She is hoping to raise $500 USD.  https://www.facebook.com/donate/2092425700866081/

If hosting a Facebook fundraiser is not for you, perhaps you would donate to Ali’s fundraiser or share the link on your Facebook, Twitter, or other social media page for all of your social media friends to see. We know she would be happy and appreciative. We would be too!

We are more than happy to have anyone host a fundraiser for us. As we posted earlier, “The unfortunate situation is that FOTWW is a very small group doing a huge job. We don’t have corporate funding or grants and each official personally pays for their own expenses including, website upkeep and hosting, travel (motels, food and car/airline expense).  We love what we are doing but sincerely need funding. If you, or anyone would volunteer as a Fundraiser, we would love to have you on board.”
 
To Ali Forest-Walker, we can’t thank you enough for your efforts and wish great success with your FOTWW fundraiser.
 
To all who donate to her FOTWW fundraiser, we say THANK YOU!
 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

 
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“Stopover Habitat” for Whooping Cranes on Corps of Engineer Lakes and military bases

May 12, 2019

by Pam Bates, Friends of the Wild Whoopers

Whooping Cranes are receiving significant awareness and interest about their habitat needs in Texas and other states. It’s happening on Corps of Engineer (COE) lakes and military bases throughout Texas. Friends of the Wild Whoopers (FOTWW) have recently completed evaluations of potential Whooping Crane “stopover habitats” on four additional Corps lakes. This brings the total assessments in Texas to fifteen lakes on Corps property and two hundred and ninety-eight ponds of various sizes (1/2 ac. to 4 ac.) on seven military bases.

FOTWW’s focus on “stopover habitat”.

FOTWW is often asked, what is the organization doing for Whooping Cranes? Our answer is that we are continuing our major project to protect and help manage “stopover habitat” for Whooping Cranes. During past years, most interest in Whooping Crane habitat has focused on Aransas National Wildlife Refuge on the Texas coast and Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada. Aransas Refuge is the wintering habitat and Wood Buffalo is the nesting habitat for the cranes.

Importantly, Whooping Cranes spend 8 to 10 weeks migrating from their Wood Buffalo nesting grounds to their Aransas National Wildlife Refuge winter habitat. They cannot fly the total 2,500 mile distance without stopping to feed and rest. They need many “stopover habitats” along the migration corridor to fulfill their needs.

Unfortunately, relatively little interest has focused on “stopover habitat” where the Whoopers stop to rest and feed every night during migration. These stopover locations are scattered all along the 2,500 mile long migration corridor between Aransas Refuge and Wood Buffalo. Chester McConnell, FOTWW’s wildlife biologist stresses that “stopover habitats” are absolutely necessary and the Whooping Crane population could not exist without these areas. Indeed, the population could not exist without all three habitat areas – the nesting habitat, winter habitat and stopover habitats.”

Habitat Importance

McConnell explains that, “Habitat is the most important need of the endangered Aransas-Wood Buffalo Whooping Crane population. It is the only remaining wild, self-sustaining Whooping Crane population on planet Earth. The Aransas-Wood Buffalo Whooping Cranes can take care of themselves with two exceptions. They need man to help protect their habitat and for people not to shoot them.” So FOTWW is dedicated to protecting and managing existing and potential stopover habitat where we can.

FOTWW has very little funding assistance and decided to work with government agencies and Indian tribes who own land distributed all along the migration corridor from North Dakota to Texas. Land is the most expensive item and the Corps, military and Indian tribes already own thousands of acres. McConnell met with these land owners and explained the habitat needs of Whooping Cranes and how they could contribute without interfering with their normal missions. Fortunately, there was exceptional support and FOTWW has been working on the mission for over three years.

McConnell explained that he uses 85 percent of his working time traveling to meet with government land managers and Indian tribe natural resource managers. He instructs them on needs of endangered Whooping Cranes and importantly, he also evaluates their wetland habitats and prepare management plans to guide them to successfully manage their “stopover habitats”.

Recent visits to Corps of Engineer lakes

Chester McConnell and his FOTWW assistant Dorothy McConnell visited Proctor Lake, Stillhouse Hollow Lake, Belton and Lake Georgetown recently to assess potential “stopover habitats” for Whooping Cranes. David Hoover, Conservation Biologist, Kansas City, MO, USACE in coordination with Lake Managers made arrangements for our visit and is a major supporter of FOTWW efforts. Park Ranger Todd Spivey led us on an in-depth tour of Stillhouse Hollow Lake and Belton Lake that allowed us to evaluate areas that are difficult to visit. FOTWW appreciates all involved with making preparations for a productive and enjoyable habitat evaluation official visit

The following photos and descriptions will assist readers to understand our work.

Figure 1: A three person team traveled by boat to numerous potential “stopover habitats” in Stillhouse Hollow Lake and Belton Lakes that wild Whooping Cranes could use during their two annual migrations. The team was evaluating the usefulness of the various locations as potential Whooping Crane “stopover habitats”. Many good sites were observed that can be easily developed and managed. (Identification from left to right: Chester McConnell, President, Friends of the Wild Whoopers; Todd Spivey, USACE Park Ranger, Stillhouse Hollow Lake; and Dorothy McConnell, Field Assistant, Friends of the Wild Whoopers.

stopover habitat
Figure 2. This is an excellent location for a Whooping Crane “stopover habitat” onStillhouse Lake, TX. Glide paths (arrows) for Whooping Cranes landing area is clear of obstructions and provides a gradual slope into the shallow water. Gradual or gentle slopes provide good entrance into the lake where water is shallow from 2 inches to 10 inches deep in roost area. The area opening in the bushes from the field to water is about 60 feet wide and provides a satisfactory place for Whooping Cranes to move to the water to roost without obstructions. No trees are in or near landing site. Horizontal visibility around the roost site is good so any predators could be observed. Whoopers can forage on insects and grains in the field and aquatic animal in the lake. There is extensive horizontal visibility from roost site so predators can be detected. The site is 200 or more yards from human development or disturbance such as power lines. Agricultural grain fields or pasture land within one mile of stopover site could be used for foraging

stopover habitat
Figure 3. This photo shows a potentially exceptional “stopover habitat” for Whooping Cranes on Stillhouse Lake, TX. The glide path for Whooping Cranes landing is clear of obstructions. Gradual or gentle slopes provide good entrance into the lake where water is shallow from 2 inches to 10 inches deep in roost area. The “orange block” shows location of area 50 feet long that needs all bushes cleared so Whooping Cranes can move from the field to water without fear of hiding predators. No trees are in or near landing site. Horizontal visibility around the roost site is good so any predators could be observed. Whoopers can forage on insects and grains in the field and aquatic animal in the lake. There is extensive horizontal visibility from roost site so predators can be detected. The site is 200 or more yards from human development or disturbance such as power lines. Agricultural grain fields or pasture land within one mile of stopover site could be used for foraging.

stopover habitat
Figure 4. This Belton Lake location is one of the better sites that we observed to serve as a potential “stopover habitat” for Whooping Cranes. Flight glide paths are clear from all directions. The few obstructions at the landing site can be easily removed by applying a chemical brush killer. There are few thick stands of bushes or trees in or near landing site and these can be remove relatively easy. FOTWW believes a chemical brush killer that kills bushes above ground, the roots underground and stumps is the preferred method to use. Clipping bushes above ground or pulling them up will leave many of the roots in place and they will soon sprout back.  ~ The gradual or gentle slopes into lakes where water is shallow is necessary for Whooping Crane roosting sites. This is the condition we observed here. The birds select lakes/ponds/wetlands with some shallow areas 2 inches to 10 inches deep for roosting sites. The cranes like extensive horizontal visibility from roost site so predators can be detected. Roost sites also need to be 200 or more yards from human development or disturbance such as power lines and loud noises. If food is not available, agricultural grain fields or pasture land should be within one mile of stopover site for foraging.

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Spring and Whooping Cranes arrive at Wood Buffalo NP

by Pam Bates

Spring is here and a few Whooping Cranes from the wild flock have arrived on the nesting grounds at Wood Buffalo National Park, (WBNP).

Whooping Cranes arrive at Wood Buffalo
Photo by Klaus Nigge. Click to view at full size.

According to Rhona Kindopp, Manager of Resource Conservation, Parks Canada. “they have been hearing and observing a number of spring arrivals in the last week or two and one of their staff members reported seeing (and hearing) 4 whoopers flying as she walked home from the office!”

Kindopp states that they are getting signals from 12 cranes marked with transmitters, and those as of Tuesday morning were coming from North and South Dakota, Kansas and Texas, and central Saskatchewan. So the flock is still spread out along the Central Flyway and heading to WBNP.

Nesting Ground conditions.

Numbers regarding whether precipitation was significantly lower than usual this year aren’t available at this time but Kindopp says that the “snow disappeared very quickly this spring. March is usually our heaviest snow month, but the snow was quickly disappearing by mid-March this year.”

Friends of the Wild Whoopers will publish updates of the nesting ground conditions and any ongoing Whooping Crane chick reproduction and related activities when it is available.

Whooping Cranes nesting information

Whooping cranes usually arrive at WBNP during late April and May after migrating 2,500 miles from Aransas Refuge on the Texas coast. Each nesting pair locates their nesting site which is normally in the same general area as past years. Park records show that several pairs have nested in the same areas for 22 consecutive years. Soon after their arrival on their nesting grounds, they build their nest. Nesting territories of breeding pairs vary in size but average about 1,500 acres. Whooping Cranes guard their territories and nesting neighbors normally locate their nest at least one-half mile away. Vegetation from the local area is normally used for nest construction and they construct their nests in shallow water.

Eggs are usually laid in late April to mid-May. Normally two eggs are laid but occasionally only one and rarely three have been observed in nests. Incubation begins when the first egg is laid. Incubation occurs for about 30 days. Because incubation starts when the first egg is laid, the first chick hatched is a day or two older than the second hatched. This difference in age is substantial and creates problem for the younger chick. It is weaker than the older chick and has difficulty keeping up as the adults move around searching for food. The younger chick often dies due to its weakness. Records indicate that only about 10% to 15% of the second chicks hatched survive.

Importantly, the second egg plays an important role in providing insurance that at least one chick survives. From the time Whoopers begin egg laying until their chicks are a few months old, the family groups remain in their breeding territory. They feed there and don’t move long distances until after their chicks fledge.

Report any sightings

With a few cranes already on the nesting grounds, the majority of the flock is still migrating north. Parks Canada is requesting if you see any whooping cranes, they would love to hear from you! Contact the Park Office at 867-872-7960.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

 

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Join USACE Kansas City District to celebrate Earth Day 2019 at the Topeka Zoo

USACE’s Earth Day Celebration at Topeka Zoo

Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Published April 18, 2019

The Kansas City District will be at the 2019 Earth Day Celebration at the Topeka Zoo on Saturday, 20 April. We will be highlighting our work to monitor and assist in the recovery of the federally listed endangered interior least tern and the threatened piping plover populations on the Kansas River.

Kids will have an opportunity to fly like an eagle and catch a fish for dinner while learning about the Corps role in recovering the bald eagle and the importance of water safety.

In the early 1970s the adverse impacts associated with pollution of our air, waters and lands was becoming extremely evident. Many animal and plant species were in serious decline. As an annual event, Earth Day began on April 22, 1970 for citizens to express concern for the environment and to work towards sustainable solutions to these environmental challenges.

This year the Earth Day theme is “Protect Our Species”.  As part of our effort to “Protect Our Species” the Corps Kansas City District implements a comprehensive environmental stewardship program on approximately 600,000 acres of land and 198,000 acres of water associated with our 18 multipurpose lake projects and the Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa.

The Corps accomplishes much of this work in cooperation and/or consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Missouri Department of Conservation, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism, Nebraska Game & Parks Commission, Iowa Department of Natural Services and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Topeka Zoo
Eight Whooping Cranes (5 adults and 3 juveniles) visiting Kanopolis Lake in Kansas. Photo was taken by Brandon Beckman, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. © November 2017

The District also works with many conservation organizations on projects like our Big Bottom Wetland Restoration Project with Duck Unlimited at our Kanopolis Lake Project and our Whooping Crane Migration Stopover Habitat Project where, working with biologists from the Friends of the Wild Whoopers, we’ve conducted habitat assessments and identified ways to improve whooping crane migration stopover habitat on our lakes in Kansas and Nebraska.

The Natural Resource Management staff at these projects is comprised of dedicated professionals who are committed to developing sustainable management solutions that conserve our native plant and animal species while at the same time providing opportunity for an appropriate related level of human use.

Earth Day at the Topeka Zoo is a great event for kids and adults alike and we hope you will stop by to learn what the Corps-Kansas City District is doing to “Protect Our Species”.

To learn more about the 2019 Earth Day Celebration visit: https://www.earthday.org/earthday/

To learn more about the Topeka Zoo including hours of operation, location and entrance fee please visit: http://topekazoo.org/

Contact

Kansas City District Public Affairs
(816) 389-3486
CENWK-PA@usace.army.mil
Kansas City, Mo.

Release no. 19-009 Original release can be found here.

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