Welcome Friends

Friends of the Wild Whoopers,  (a.k.a FOTWW) is a 501c3 nonprofit conservation organization whose mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat.

We would like to educate those who have an interest in protecting this beautiful American bird, as well as bringing you the latest news on the Whooper.

Make sure you subscribe to stay informed. If you would like to contribute in any way, we would love to hear from you. Donations are always welcome to help with our expenses.

 

Fall 2020 Whooping Crane migration in full swing

Migration Underway

migration
Migrating Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan. © 2019 Photo by Rodney Brown

Migration of the only natural wild population of whooping cranes is underway. The Whooping Crane migration from Wood Buffalo to Aransas NWR is about 2,500 miles in length and can take as many as 50 days to complete. The flock is expected to migrate through Nebraska, North Dakota and other states along the Central Flyway over the next several weeks. The Wildlife Fish and Game and Parks agencies along the flyway encourage the public to report any whooping crane sightings.

If you should observe a whooping crane as they migrate along the Central Flyway, please report them to the proper agencies. We have compiled a list of agencies and contact information below. If you need help with identification, please click on our Whooper Identification page.

Canadian reports

Any sightings of Whooping Cranes in Canada:
Whooping Crane Hotline is 306-975-5595. That will get you to Wildlife Biologist John Conkin. Leave a detailed message for a callback.

Montana reports

Allison Begley
MT Fish, Wildlife, & Parks
1420 East Sixth Avenue
Helena, MT  59620
abegley@mt.gov
(406) 444-3370

Jim Hansen
MT Fish, Wildlife, & Parks
2300 Lake Elmo Drive
Billings, MT  59105
jihansen@mt.gov
(406) 247-2957

North Dakota

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offices at Lostwood, (701-848-2466)
Audubon, (701-442-5474)
National wildlife refuges
North Dakota Game and Fish Department in Bismarck, (701-328-6300) or to local game wardens

South Dakota

Eileen Dowd Stukel; eileen.dowdstukel@state.sd.us; (605-773-4229)
Casey Heimerl; (605-773-4345)
Natalie Gates; Natalie_Gates@fws.gov; (605-224-8793), ext. 227
Jay Peterson; Jay_Peterson@fws.gov; (605-885-6320), ext. 213

Nebraska

Nebraska Game and Parks (402-471-0641)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (308-379-5562)
The Crane Trust’s Whooper Watch hotline (888-399-2824)
Emails may be submitted to joel.jorgensen@nebraska.gov

Kansas

Jason Wagner
jason.wagner@ks.gov
(620-793-3066)

Ed Miller
ed.miller@ks.gov
(620-331-6820)

Whooping Crane sightings at or near Quivira NWR should be reported to:
Quivira National Wildlife Refuge
620-486-2393
They can also be reported to this email:  quivira@fws.gov

Oklahoma

Sightings can be logged online here

Matt Fullerton
Endangered Species Biologist
(580-571-5820)

Mark Howery
Wildlife Diversity Biologist
(405-990-7259)

Texas

Texas Whooper Watch also has a project in I-Naturalist that is now fully functional. You can find it here. You can report sightings directly in I-Naturalist via your Smart Phone. This allows you to easily provide photo verification and your location.

If you are not a smart phone app user, you can still report via email: whoopingcranes@tpwd.state.tx.us or phone: (512-389-999). Please note that our primary interest is in reports from outside the core wintering range.

Do not disturb and why reporting is important

Should you see a whooping crane during migration, please do not get close or disturb it. Keep your distance and make a note of date, time, location, and what the whooping crane is doing. If the whooping crane is wearing bands or a transmitter, please note the color(s) and what leg(s) the bands are on.

migration
Migrating Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan. ©2019  Photo by Val Mann

You may wonder why the wild life agencies are asking for these sightings to be reported. The reports are very helpful in gathering data and information on when and where the whooping cranes stopover, what type of habitat they are choosing, and how many there are.

With just over 500 wild whooping cranes migrating along the Central Flyway, odds are low of seeing a wild whooping crane. However, FOTWW hopes that someone reading this article will be one of the lucky few. If you are, please report your sighting so that these agencies and other conservation groups, including FOTWW can continue helping these magnificent cranes.

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

fall migration
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org
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COVID cancels annual surveys at Wood Buffalo National Park

Several people have asked Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) about the nesting and fledgling surveys annually conducted on the nesting grounds at Wood Buffalo National Park, (WBNP). We now have an answer for those interested and asking.

We contacted the park and Rhona Kindopp, Resource Conservation Manager at WBNP informed us that unfortunately the regular summer surveys were cancelled in 2020 due to COVID. She stated that they will be looking forward to resuming whooping crane nest and fledgling surveys next year. She also mentioned that currently their colleagues at the Canadian Wildlife Service, (CWS) are conducting some monitoring of migration in Saskatchewan. If we receive any news or information from CWS, we will be more than happy to pass the news on to everyone.

We know everyone looks forward to the news and photos out of Wood Buffalo NP. So not to leave you disappointed we will share with you some photos taken during previous surveys. We hope you enjoy them as much now as you did when they were originally posted.

Wood Buffalo National Park
Whooping crane nesting habitat on Wood Buffalo. Photo by Klaus Nigge
Wood Buffalo National Park.
Whooping Crane habitat on Wood Buffalo National Park. photo by Jane Peterson WBNP
Wood Buffalo National Park.
Photo: courtesy of Parks Canada and John McKinnon
Wood Buffalo National Park
Two adults and one juvenile whooping crane. Photo: John McKinnon / ©2014 Parks Canada /Wood Buffalo National Park.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

fall migration
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org
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FOTWW featured in September issue of Eastern Crane Bulletin

A big thank you to our friends at the Eastern Crane Bulletin. The September issue, featuring extensive coverage of Friends of the Wild Whoopers and our “stopover habitat” program, is now available online.

Eastern Crane BulletinThe Eastern Crane E-bulletin covers news about the Eastern Populations of Sandhill and Whooping Cranes, as well as general information about cranes and the continuing work for the protection of these birds and their habitats.

To read or download a pdf of the Eastern Crane Bulletin – September 2020 issue, please go here:
https://kyc4sandhillcranes.files.wordpress.com/2020/09/eastern-crane-bulletin_september-2020.pdf

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***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

fall migration
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org
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Whooping Crane in an Alberta Wetland

A couple weeks ago, Lynne Morck was on a drive about enjoying the scenery that Alberta has. She was west on Innisfail, Alberta, Canada and came upon one lone Whooping Crane enjoying some wetlands. Lynne said that this was the first time she has encountered whooping cranes. Imagine her excitement. The lone crane spent some time foraging in the shallow waters and after a time decided to take flight and go elsewhere.

At first Lynne didn’t believe that she had actually encountered a whooping crane in the wild. However, once arriving home and studying her photos she was able to verify her unique discovery. She sent us the photos of her find and given up permission to share them with you. We hope that you enjoy them as much as we did!

Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) thanks Lynne for sharing her experience and photos with us.

Be sure to click on the photos to enlarge.

Alberta, Canada
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Alberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Alberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Alberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Albberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Alberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck
Albberta
Whooping crane in Alberta, Canada ©Photo by Lynne Morck

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

fall migration
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org
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