If at first you don’t succeed, try again!

Homer Moyers, Jr. and his wife had gone to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in the spring for the first time to photograph the whooping cranes at the refuge. However, the morning of their trip was so foggy all of their photos were pretty disappointing. At that time they decided they had to go back in November and indeed they did return. They found out about Kevin Sim’s charter boats, Aransas Bay Birding Charters, and booked a trip on the Jack Flash.

Monday, November 25 2019, was a beautiful morning for observing and photographing all the various birds on the refuge. Homer sent us some photos taken during their outing and we have compiled them into short slideshow for your enjoyment.

Friends of the Wild Whoopers thanks Homer for sending us the fabulous photos and we are sure that you will enjoy them as much as we did.

Whooping cranes from the natural wild population enjoying some tasty treats at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Photos courtesy of Homer Moyers, Jr. View slideshow at full screen for best results.

MUSIC: At The Shore – The Dark Contenent by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100770
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.
FOTWW on GuideStar

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Giving Tuesday 2019

December 3, 2019 is Giving Tuesday! Will you please consider donating to Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) so that we can continue our Whooping Crane “Stopover Habitat” project?

FOTWW has completed “stopover habitat” evaluations on 32 military facilities, 8 Indian Reservations and 34 USACE lakes ( U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters ), within the wild Whooping Crane six state migration corridor. All of the evaluations were done at our expense, and were made possible by donations from our supporters who believe in our mission.

Our “stopover habitat” project is ongoing with many lakes and potential habitats remaining to be evaluated.

Every donation that we receive is greatly appreciated and will go toward our “stopover habitat” efforts.

Ways to donate:
1. Go to our webpage and click on the “Donate” button.

2. You can set up your own Giving Tuesday Facebook Fundraiser benefiting Friends of the Wild Whoopers.

Thank you for supporting our mission and conservation efforts! #HabitatMatters ~FOTWW

Giving Tuesday
Whooping crane family enjoying the habitat on the wintering grounds in Texas. © Photo by Chuck Hardin

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.
FOTWW on GuideStar

fall migration
friendsofthewildwhoopers.org

 

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Whooping Crane Fall Migration – 2019

Fall Migration Underway

whooping crane fall migration
Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan during fall migration. Photo by Beryl Peake – 2018

Fall migration of the only natural wild population of whooping cranes is underway. The Whooping Crane migration from Wood Buffalo to Aransas NWR is about 2,500 miles in length and can take as many as 50 days to complete. The flock is expected to migrate through Nebraska, North Dakota and other states along the Central Flyway over the next several weeks. The Wildlife Fish and Game and Parks agencies along the flyway encourage the public to report any whooping crane sightings.

If you should observe a whooping crane as they migrate along the Central Flyway, please report them to the proper agencies. We have compiled a list of agencies and contact information below. If you need help with identification, please click on our Whooper Identification page.

Montana reports

Allison Begley
MT Fish, Wildlife, & Parks
1420 East Sixth Avenue
Helena, MT  59620
abegley@mt.gov
(406) 444-3370

Jim Hansen
MT Fish, Wildlife, & Parks
2300 Lake Elmo Drive
Billings, MT  59105
jihansen@mt.gov
(406) 247-2957

North Dakota

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offices at Lostwood, (701-848-2466)
Audubon, (701-442-5474)
National wildlife refuges
North Dakota Game and Fish Department in Bismarck, (701-328-6300) or to local game wardens

South Dakota

Eileen Dowd Stukel; eileen.dowdstukel@state.sd.us; (605-773-4229)
Casey Heimerl; (605-773-4345)
Natalie Gates; Natalie_Gates@fws.gov; (605-224-8793), ext. 227
Jay Peterson; Jay_Peterson@fws.gov; (605-885-6320), ext. 213

Nebraska

Nebraska Game and Parks (402-471-0641)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (308-379-5562)
The Crane Trust’s Whooper Watch hotline (888-399-2824)
Emails may be submitted to joel.jorgensen@nebraska.gov

Kansas

Jason Wagner
jason.wagner@ks.gov
(620-793-3066)

Ed Miller
ed.miller@ks.gov
(620-331-6820)

Whooping Crane sightings at or near Quivira NWR should be reported to:
Quivira National Wildlife Refuge
620-486-2393
They can also be reported to this email:  quivira@fws.gov

Oklahoma

Sightings can be logged online here

Matt Fullerton
Endangered Species Biologist
(580-571-5820)

Mark Howery
Wildlife Diversity Biologist
(405-990-7259)

Texas

Texas Whooper Watch also has a project in I-Naturalist that is now fully functional. You can find it here. You can report sightings directly in I-Naturalist via your Smart Phone. This allows you to easily provide photo verification and your location.

If you are not a smart phone app user, you can still report via email: whoopingcranes@tpwd.state.tx.us or phone: (512-389-999). Please note that our primary interest is in reports from outside the core wintering range.

Do not disturb and why reporting is important

Should you see a whooping crane, please do not get close or disturb it. Keep your distance and make a note of date, time, location, and what the whooping crane is doing. If the whooping crane is wearing bands or a transmitter, please note the color(s) and what leg(s) the bands are on.

whooping crane fall migration
Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan during their fall migration. Photo by Kim and Val Mann – 2018

You may wonder why the wild life agencies are asking for these sightings to be reported. The reports are very helpful in gathering data and information on when and where the whooping cranes stopover, what type of habitat they are choosing, and how many there are.
With just over 500 wild whooping cranes migrating along the Central Flyway, odds are low of seeing a wild whooping crane. However, FOTWW hopes that someone reading this article will be one of the lucky few and if you are, please report your sighting so that these agencies and other conservation groups, including FOTWW can continue helping these magnificent cranes.

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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Some good things come in small packages

by Chester McConnell, FOTWW

Good things come in small packages

Sometimes good things come in small packages. For example Hords Creek Lake in mid-west Texas is on my mind. Friends of the Wild Whoopers visited this Corps of Engineers (COE) lake recently and we were totally surprised. The purpose for our visit was to evaluate existing and potential “stopover habitat” for wild Whooping Cranes. To our pleasant surprise, we visited a fantastic place. During our 876 mile road trip back to our home office we discussed our habitat survey of all four lakes we visited (Jim Chapman, Ray Roberts, Lewisville and Hords Creek).
During the past two years FOTWW has visited 27 COE Lakes in Texas and all have good programs that focus on natural environmental resources. While all COE lakes we have visited are impressive places, some including Hords Creek Lake are special.

Dorothy McConnell, FOTWW’s Field Assistant summed up our discussion by stating: “Hords Creek Lake is small but has beautiful and bountiful habitat for any visiting wild Whooping Cranes.” The lake’s conservation pool is only 510 acres – small when compared with most COE lakes. But size is only a part of what one must take into account when evaluating lakes for the Whoopers. When considering all the other features including fishing, bird watching, swimming and camping you have a lavish set of resource at Hords Creek Lake.

Impressive diversity

The diversity of habitats at Hords Creek is impressive from beaver pond wetlands, to abundant shore area shallows and the western section shallow area. The following figures will give readers a better perspective of Hords Creek Lake.

Good things come in small packages - Hords Creek Lake
Figure 1. The wetland in this photo was created by beavers building a dam in a stream below Hords Creek Lake. Whooping Cranes often “stopover” in these wetland types to rest forage and roost.
Good things come in small packages - Hords Creek Lake
Figure 2. The pond in this photo aids in supplying clear water to the beaver wetland down stream. Also the proposed cleared area will provide a good foraging area for the cranes.
Good things come in small packages - Hords Creek Lake
Figure 3. Located between the two arrows is a wetland formed in a shallow inlet. Total size is one acre with much foraging foods for Whooping Cranes. Several similar wetlands are located around the lake shore.
Good things come in small packages - Hords Creek Lake
Figure 4. This photo shows a typical shore area of Hords Creek Lake. Whooping Cranes can walk down the gradual incline shore area into the shallow water where they prefer to roost. Note the narrow stand of grass and aquatic weeds along the shore that provides habitat for frogs, salamanders and various aquatic insects that Whoopers can feed on. The short bushes in the shallow water may provide some protection for the 5 foot tall Whoopers who can reach over the bushes and attack any predators.
Good things come in small packages - Hords Creek Lake
Figure 5. This beautiful shore area is typical along much of the shore. Such wetland areas all contribute to the food supply and roosting sites for wild Whooping Cranes. Much of the shore area is mowed often to maintain the “park like” habitat. It also serves any Whooping Cranes that may visit the lake.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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