2018 Whooping Crane Fall Migration Underway

Fall Migration Underway

whooping crane fall migration
Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan during fall migration. Photo by Beryl Peake

Friends of the Wild Whoopers, (FOTWW) has received several reports and photographs of Whooping Cranes staging in Saskatchewan, Canada. On October 5th, a Whooping Crane was spotted and photographed at Quivira NWR, in Kansas. It can be said that the fall migration of the only natural wild population of whooping cranes is underway. The flock is expected to migrate through Nebraska, North Dakota and other states along the Central Flyway over the next several weeks. The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department and other state Fish and Game agencies along the flyway encourage the public to report any whooping crane sightings.

Nebraska reports

If you see a whooping crane in Nebraska, please report your whooping crane sighting to Nebraska Game and Parks (402-471-0641), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (308-379-5562), or The Crane Trust’s Whooper Watch hotline (888-399-2824). Emails may be submitted to joel.jorgensen@nebraska.gov.

North Dakota reports

If you see a whooping crane in North Dakota, please report your whooping crane sighting to, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offices at Lostwood, (701) 848-2466, or Long Lake, (701) 387-4397, national wildlife refuges; the state Game and Fish Department in Bismarck, (701) 328-6300, or to local game wardens across the state.

Oklahoma reports

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation is asking for your help in logging the migration path of the cranes. Sightings can be logged online here or by calling Endangered species biologist Matt Fullerton at 580-571-5820 or wildlife diversity biologist Mark Howery at 405-990-7259.

Texas report

Texas Whooper Watch also has a project in I-Naturalist that is now fully functional. You can find it here. You can report sightings directly in I-Naturalist via your Smart Phone. This allows you to easily provide photo verification and your location. If you are not a smart phone app user, you can still report via email: whoopingcranes@tpwd.state.tx.us or phone: (512) 389-TXWW (8999). Please note that our primary interest is in reports from outside the core wintering range.

Keep your distance and why reporting is important

Should you see a whooping crane, please do not get close or disturb it. Keep your distance and make a note of date, time, location, and what the whooping crane is doing. If the whooping crane is wearing bands or a transmitter, please note the color(s) and what leg(s) the bands are on.

whooping crane fall migration
Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan during their fall migration. Photo by Kim and Val Mann

You may wonder why the wild life agencies are asking for these sightings to be reported. The reports are very helpful in gathering data and information on when and where the whooping cranes stopover, what type of habitat they are choosing, and how many there are.
With just over 500 wild whooping cranes migrating along the Central Flyway, odds are low of seeing a wild whooping crane. However, FOTWW hopes that someone reading this article will be one of the lucky few and if you are, please report your sighting so that these agencies and other conservation groups, including FOTWW can continue helping these magnificent cranes.

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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More wetland ponds needed on Navarro Mills Lake says FOTWW

by Pam Bates, Friends of the Wild Whoopers

About Navarro Mills Lake

Navarro Mills Lake is, located in central Texas about 20 miles west of Corsicana, Texas and about 35 miles east of Waco, Texas. It is managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District.  The primary purpose of the lake was flood control and water supply, although recreation is now a major economic factor. Recreation has become a major component in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ multiple use approach to managing our nations’ natural resources. Improving recreational opportunities and improving fish and wildlife habitat are important facets of the Corps’ management policies. Hunting, fishing, and water sports are available to the public.

FOTWW Recommendations

Friends of the Wild Whoopers (FOTWW) eagerly recommends that more endangered Whooping Crane “stopover habitats” be added to the management list needs at Navarro Mills Lake in Texas. The recommendation was made by FOTWW after their recent evaluation of potential Whooping Crane habitats on lake properties.

FOTWW President Chester McConnell complimented U.S. Corps of Engineers managers for the wetland development accomplishments made in the past at Navarro Mills Lake. McConnell explained that, “Development and management of the existing wetland ponds in the lake’s Wetland Units 1 and 2 currently provides a diversity of “stopover habitats” for endangered Whooping Cranes and thousands of waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds and other wildlife species that need wetlands.”

McConnell continued by explaining that, “There are additional sites within Wetland Unit 1 and 2 that could be developed to increase the number of shallow wetland ponds. FOTWW urges the Corps to set a firm goal to increase the number and size of the shallow water wetlands within the two wetland complexes.”

Navarro Mills Lake
Figure 1. This shallow water pond in Wetland Unit 1 serves as an excellent “stopover habitat” for migrating Whooping Cranes and thousands of waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds and other wildlife species that need wetlands. FOTWW asserts that there is ample space for more ponds like this in Wetland Units 1 and 2.

Whooping Crane Stopovers on Lakes

Navarro Mills Lake
Figure 2 . Many species, including white tailed deer share habitats with Whooping Cranes.

Mostly, during migration, Whooping Cranes “stopover” on lakes, natural wetlands and small ponds on private farms just to rest overnight. Like humans on a long trip they just need a small place to briefly stop, feed, rest and then continue their journey. Importantly, Whoopers are compatible with other wildlife and briefly share their habitats. Ensuring that sufficient areas with the proper conditions as stopover sites are available is important for the survival of the species. Proactive projects implemented by conservation interest can help reduce potential mortality that occurs during migration.

Whooping Cranes make two 2,500 mile migrations each year. They migrate to and from their winter habitats on the Texas coast to their nesting habitats in northern Canada. They must stop over 15 to 30 times during migration to rest and forage for food.

FOTWW believes that the wild Whooping Cranes in the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population are capable of taking care of themselves with two exceptions. They need (1) humans to protect their habitats and (2) to stop shooting them. We firmly believe that the USACE can do much on their lakes to protect and manage many “stopover habitats” within the migration corridor.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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Whooping Cranes in Saskatchewan-Spring 2018

Kim and Val Mann are avid birders and lucky enough to live within the migration corridor in Saskatchewan. Every spring and fall, the two of them enjoy the offerings that the grid roads have to offer and hope they will be lucky enough to see a whooping crane or two. When they are lucky to see and photograph whooping cranes, they are kind enough to send us some of their photos to share with all of you. This spring was no different. While out for a “drive about” on Monday, they saw some of our beloved whooping cranes who are still migrating through Saskatchewan on their way to Wood Buffalo National Park.

Whooping Cranes in Saskatchewan
Photo #6846 – Whooping Crane pair feeding Monday afternoon. Photo by Kim and Val Mann ~ Click photo to view at full size.

Kim states that “two Whooping Cranes with a flock of Sandhill Cranes were sighted south of Regina on Monday. The cranes were about a mile from the road. In addition to being extremely far, the heat haze/shimmer was terrible. Long range telephoto camera lenses are extremely susceptible to this effect – the resulting photos look like one is looking through warped glass fragments. The background in Photo 6846 shows the effect of extreme heat haze. The photos of the crane pair have limited cropping to reduce the heat haze effects.”

Whooping cranes in Saskatchewan
Photo #7103 – whooping crane pair walking in the farmer’s field Tuesday morning. Photo by Kim and Val Mann.

Kim and Val returned to the same area on Tuesday morning to see if the Whooping Cranes were still there. “The cranes were still there but still very far from any roads. Heat haze was bad and the wind had picked up and was quite strong.”

Kim says that “Seeing Whooping Cranes during spring migration was amazing!”

Photo #7271 – the pair roosting on a large dirt pile by the shore. The grey “sky” is actually dust/dirt blowing off the ground. Photo by Kim and Val Mann ~ Click photo to view at full size.

Friends of the Wild Whoopers thanks Kim and Val for sharing their photos and experience of seeing the whooping cranes in Saskatchewan. We enjoyed their photos and story this spring as much as we have always enjoyed them in past posts that they have shared with us. We hope you enjoy them as well.

Be sure to click on the photos to view them at full size.

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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Fairest of them all: Rare white crane hangs out with gray sandhillers near Fort Kearny

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A rare white leucistic sandhill crane hangs out Saturday morning with its gray friends in a cornfield west of Fort Kearny State Historical Park. Leucism is a genetic mutation causing partial loss of pigmentation, so many leucistic cranes have some gray feathers. This one appears to be all white. Photo by Lori Potter, Kearney Hub

A quick first glance might leave you to think that this white crane is a whooping crane. However, it is not a whooping crane but a sandhill crane with an abnormality called leucism. Leucism is an abnormal condition of reduced pigmentation affecting various animals (such as birds, mammals, and reptiles) that is marked by overall pale color or patches of reduced coloring and is caused by a genetic mutation which inhibits melanin and other pigments from being deposited in feathers, hair, or skin.

This rare white-as-snow sandhill crane was spotted Saturday morning in a group of several hundred gray cranes eating in a cornfield west of Fort Kearny State Historical Park.

Read more about this leucistic sandhill crane here.

 

***** FOTWW’s mission is to help preserve and protect the Aransas/Wood Buffalo
population of wild whooping cranes and their habitat. *****

Friends of the Wild Whoopers is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

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